Here's a Complete List of Human Rights Everyone Should Know About (2023)

Here's a Complete List of Human Rights Everyone Should Know About (1)

Certain rights are granted to every individual irrespective of their nationality and religion. These are known as human rights, and are aimed at ensuring that every individual is entitled to a dignified and prosperous life. Read on to know more about their importance and the role they play in today's global, multicultural world.

Human rights are equal and inalienable rights of any person, inherent due to the sole reason that he or she is human.

A UN committee, headed by Eleanor Roosevelt, drafted the document that defined and universally granted the basic rights to all human beings, terming them the equal and inalienable rights of every human being. The Declaration, known as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), was adopted by the UN General Assembly on December 10, 1948.

The UN, formed in 1945 to replace the defunct League of Nations, was the first to put up a formal global setup to define human rights. Individual countries had their own codes concerning human rights before the UN stepped in, but with the horrors of the Holocaust still fresh in the world’s collective conscience, the UN’s authoritative intervention became crucial.

Here’s the list of human rights described in the UDHR.

Human Rights

Article 1 — Right To Equality

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2 — Freedom From Discrimination

Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

Article 3 — Right to Security of Person

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

Article 4 — Freedom from Slavery

No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

Article 5 — Freedom From Inhumane Treatment

No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment or punishment.

Article 6 — Right To Legal Recognition

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Everyone has the right to be recognized as a person before the law.

Article 7 — Right To Equality Before the Law

All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

Article 9 — Freedom From Arbitrary Legal Prosecution

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Article 10 — Right To Fair Public Hearing

Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

Article 11 — Right To Be Considered Innocent Until Proven Guilty

(1) Everyone charged with a penal offense has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defense.

(2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offense on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offense, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offense was committed.

Article 12 — Freedom From Interference

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honor and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

Article 13 — Right To Free Movement

(1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each State.

(2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.

Article 14 — Right to Asylum From Prosecution

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(1) Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy asylum from persecution in other countries.

(2) This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 15 — Right To A Nationality

(1) Everyone has the right to a nationality.

(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

Article 16 — Right To Marriage

(1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.

(2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.

(3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

Article 17 — Right To Own Property

(1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.

(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

Article 18 — Freedom Of Belief

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes the freedom to change religion or belief, and the freedom — either alone or in community with others and in public or private — to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

Article 19 — Freedom Of Speech

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

Article 20 — Right To Peaceful Assembly and Association

(1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.

(2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

Article 21 — Right To Participate In Government

(1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.

(2) Everyone has the right to equal access to public service in his country.

(3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

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Article 22 — Right To Social Security

Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

Article 23 — Right To Desirable Employment

(1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favorable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.

(2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.

(3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favorable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.

(4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

Article 24 — Right To Rest

Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

Article 25 — Right To Adequate Living Standard

(1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing, and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.

(2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.

Article 26 — Right To Education

(1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.

(2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.

(3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

Article 27 — Right To Participate in and Enjoy the Culture of One’s Community

(1) Everyone has the right to freely participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.

(2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

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Article 28 — Right To Realization of This Declaration

Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

Article 29 — Duties To Community

(1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.

(2) In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.

(3) These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 30 — Freedom From Interference in Above Rights

Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.

Violations

Human rights are a sanctum of the civilized world. The interpretation of these rights is subject to the legislation of respective regions, but the UN does its best to ensure that these human rights are made available to each and every human being on the planet. These rights revolve around and highlight the importance of preserving justice, peace, mutual respect and, above all, dignity.

Violation of human rights ranges from wars and genocides to workplace harassment and all that falls in between. The Declaration of Human Rights was, in fact, drafted on the backdrop of the terrible genocide of Jews by Nazis.

Starvation, lack of medical facilities, lack of food, torture, human trafficking etc. all come under the heading of human rights violations. When the freedom to speak, express, write, move around one’s own country or city are curbed and put under restriction, it constitutes human rights violations. Laws that do not allow interracial marriages, inter-caste marriages, same-sex marriages also violate human rights; although very few countries legally forbid interracial marriages, same-sex marriages are still illegal in most countries. Even in this age of seemingly liberal societies and sophisticated mentalities, same-sex couples have to fight protracted legal battles just to be together with one another, women are molested on a frighteningly regular basis and children are forced into labor without concern for their education or well-being.

One of the most rampant examples of human rights violation is crimes against women. In a dominantly patriarchal modern world, women are often meted out humiliating treatment. Female infanticide is still rampant in many countries, particularly in Asia and Africa. There are many countries where women are not allowed to exercise the right to education or the freedom to choose the man they want to marry.

Child abuse is another form of human rights violation, wherein children are forced into labor and/or abused physically, mentally or sexually. Child labor is a human rights violation that takes away the freedom and the joy of childhood from children. The child laborers are, more often than not, denied proper education, so as to maximize their output, and usually underpaid and overworked.

Human rights violations also include seemingly banal issues, such as employment discrimination, banning the rights of an individual to wear what they please etc.

Violations of the aforementioned fundamental rights of all human beings, occurring anywhere in the world, are not just a taunt to the piece of paper holding the Declaration of Human Rights, but to the very basis of humanity itself.

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FAQs

What are the top 10 most important human rights? ›

These include the right to life, the right to a fair trial, freedom from torture and other cruel and inhuman treatment, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and the rights to health, education and an adequate standard of living.

What are the 12 human rights? ›

Appendix 5: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (abbreviated)
Article 1Right to Equality
Article 9Freedom from Arbitrary Arrest and Exile
Article 10Right to Fair Public Hearing
Article 11Right to be Considered Innocent until Proven Guilty
Article 12Freedom from Interference with Privacy, Family, Home and Correspondence
25 more rows

What are the top 5 most important human rights? ›

10 Examples of Human Rights
  • #1. The right to life. ...
  • #2. The right to freedom from torture and inhumane treatment. ...
  • #3. The right to equal treatment before the law. ...
  • #4. The right to privacy. ...
  • #5. The right to asylum. ...
  • #6. The right to marry and have family. ...
  • #7. The right to freedom of thought, religion, opinion, and expression. ...
  • #8.

Is there a list of human rights? ›

Those 30 articles currently known as 30 universal declaration of human rights or 30 basic human rights, including rights to life, rights to education, rights to organize and rights to treated fair among others things. The 30 universal human rights also cover up freedom of opinion, expression, thought and religion.

What are the most basic human rights? ›

They range from the most fundamental - the right to life - to those that make life worth living, such as the rights to food, education, work, health, and liberty.

What are the 3 most important human rights? ›

They include the right to life, the right to health and the right to freedom from torture.

What is the 30th human right? ›

No One Can Take Away Your Human Rights. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.

What are the 7 basic human rights? ›

Everyone has the right to life, liberty, and personal security. Freedom from persecution, access to education, health-care and decent living conditions are all fundamental human rights. Prime Production provides services to numerous specialised agencies who are dedicated to the rights of citizens around the world.

What are the 5 types of human rights? ›

The UDHR and other documents lay out five kinds of human rights: economic, social, cultural, civil, and political. Economic, social, and cultural rights include the right to work, the right to food and water, the right to housing, and the right to education.

What is the least important human right? ›

The rights ranked as some of the least important by all eight countries include the right to fight elections without spending limits, the right to operate a company with few regulations, and the right to live in an area without many immigrants.

What are the five basic human rights being violated? ›

Denying services and information about health (the right to health) Discriminating at work based on traits like race, gender, and sexual orientation (The right to work) Failing to provide maternity leave (protection of and assistance to the family) Not paying a sufficient minimum wage (rights at work)

What are the 10 civil rights? ›

Civil Liberties
  • Freedom of speech.
  • Freedom of the press.
  • Freedom of religion.
  • Freedom to vote.
  • Freedom against unwarranted searches of your home or property.
  • Freedom to have a fair court trial.
  • Freedom to remain silent in a police interrogation.

What are human rights issues today? ›

Injustices like wage theft, discrimination, and physical endangerment occur all the time. Work systems can make work-life balance difficult, taking a toll on employees' mental health. In many places, inadequate pay is also an issue. The federal minimum wage in the United States has remained the same since 2009.

What are the 3 types of human rights? ›

  • Right to Security from Harm. While there are many accepted human rights, they tend to fall into a few specific categories. ...
  • Right to Legal Equality. Another common category of human rights is the expectation to receive equal protection under the law. ...
  • Right to Political Participation.
Nov 14, 2021

What human right is most violated? ›

Rome, 12 October 2018 – The right to food is a fundamental pillar to the right to life. Yet it is also arguably the most violated human right globally. Today, hundreds of millions of children, women and men – 821 million people – remain food insecure.

Is water a human right? ›

Access to safe drinking water and sanitation are internationally recognized human rights, derived from the right to an adequate standard of living under Article 11(1) of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Can my human rights be taken away from me? ›

In claiming our human rights, we are making a moral claim, normally on our own government, that you cannot do that, because it is a violation of my moral sphere and my personal dignity. No-one – no individual, no government – can ever take away our human rights.

Why human rights Cannot be taken away? ›

Human rights are inalienable.

This means that you cannot lose them, because they are linked to the very fact of human existence, they are inherent to all human beings. In particular circumstances some – though not all – may be suspended or restricted.

What are the 4 types of rights? ›

  • RIGHTS: 4 KINDS. There are four basic kinds of right or liberty: biological, economic, cultural, and political. Each such right is the freedom to participate in (or have access. ...
  • - -
  • -- - -
  • -
  • party, to vote or be vbted for, is the same as freedom to participate in the. pol it i ca l system.

What are 4 human rights violations? ›

Abductions, arbitrary arrests, detentions without trial, political executions, assassinations, and torture often follow. In cases where extreme violations of human rights have occurred, reconciliation and peacebuilding become much more difficult.

Is choice a human right? ›

Everyone has a right to pursue choices that others may consider unwise – for example, eating unhealthy foods, engaging in dangerous sports, buying lottery tickets, etc. This right does not diminish simply because a person uses care services.

How many human rights are there? ›

The 30 rights and freedoms set out in the UDHR include the right to be free from torture, the right to freedom of expression, the right to education and the right to seek asylum. It includes civil and political rights, such as the rights to life, liberty and privacy.

What are human rights abuse? ›

Definition of human rights abuse

: violation of the basic rights of people by treating them wrongly The government has been accused of human rights abuses.

What are some examples of human rights abuses? ›

The most significant human rights issues included excessive use of force by police, including torture resulting in death and injuries; rape by police; harsh and life- threatening prison conditions; assault on and harassment of journalists; corruption in all branches of government; lack of accountability in cases of ...

What rights do I have? ›

They guarantee rights such as religious freedom, freedom of the press, and trial by jury to all American citizens. First Amendment: Freedom of religion, freedom of speech and the press, the right to assemble, the right to petition government. Second Amendment: The right to form a militia and to keep and bear arms.

What are 5 political rights? ›

Political rights give to the citizens the right to equality before law and the right to participate in the political process. They include such rights as the right to vote and elect representatives, the right to contest elections, the right to form political parties or join them.

What are examples of natural rights? ›

Those natural rights examples found in the U.S. Bill of Rights would be freedoms of religion, speech, assembly, privacy, and equality under the law. By virtue of being born, these rights are unalienable.

What type of human right is right to life? ›

Article 2 of the Human Rights Act protects your right to life. This means that nobody, including the Government, can try to end your life.

What are the 5 types of human rights? ›

The UDHR and other documents lay out five kinds of human rights: economic, social, cultural, civil, and political. Economic, social, and cultural rights include the right to work, the right to food and water, the right to housing, and the right to education.

What are 5 rights of a citizen? ›

WEEK 5:RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF CITIZENS
S/NORIGHT OF CITIZENS
2It is a citizen's right to enjoy social services
3It is a citizen's right to freely own property
4It is the right of a citizen to enjoy security and peace in the state.
5It is the right of a citizen to be voted for
2 more rows
Jun 4, 2020

What are the 3 types of human rights? ›

  • Right to Security from Harm. While there are many accepted human rights, they tend to fall into a few specific categories. ...
  • Right to Legal Equality. Another common category of human rights is the expectation to receive equal protection under the law. ...
  • Right to Political Participation.
Nov 14, 2021

What is the most neglected human right? ›

One of the most common rights that are usually overlooked in most parts of the world is the right to water. As simple as the term is, it is quite extensive. So, what does it mean? Well, according to the United Nations, it is the right to a safe, sufficient, affordable, acceptable, and physically accessible.

What are the 30 Universal Declaration of Human Rights? ›

The 30 rights and freedoms set out in the UDHR include the right to asylum, the right to freedom from torture, the right to free speech and the right to education. It includes civil and political rights, like the right to life, liberty, free speech and privacy.

What are the five basic human rights being violated? ›

Denying services and information about health (the right to health) Discriminating at work based on traits like race, gender, and sexual orientation (The right to work) Failing to provide maternity leave (protection of and assistance to the family) Not paying a sufficient minimum wage (rights at work)

What are the 4 types of rights? ›

  • RIGHTS: 4 KINDS. There are four basic kinds of right or liberty: biological, economic, cultural, and political. Each such right is the freedom to participate in (or have access. ...
  • - -
  • -- - -
  • -
  • party, to vote or be vbted for, is the same as freedom to participate in the. pol it i ca l system.

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