Quetiapine (Seroquel) | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness (2022)

Brand names:

  • Seroquel®
    • Tablet (immediate release): 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg, 400 mg
  • Seroquel XR®
    • Tablet (extended release): 50 mg, 150 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg, 400 mg

Generic name: quetiapine (kwe TYE a peen)

All FDA black box warnings are at the end of this fact sheet. Please review before taking this medication.

What Is Quetiapine And What Does It Treat?

Quetiapine is a medication that works in the brain to treat schizophrenia. It is also known as a second generation antipsychotic (SGA) or atypical antipsychotic. Quetiapine rebalances dopamine and serotonin to improve thinking, mood, and behavior.

Symptoms of schizophrenia include:

  • Hallucinations — imagined voices or images that seem real
  • Delusions — beliefs that are not true (e.g., other people are reading your thoughts)
  • Disorganized thinking or trouble organizing your thoughts and making sense
  • Little desire to be around other people
  • Trouble speaking clearly
  • Lack of motivation

Quetiapine may help some or all of these symptoms.

Quetiapine is also FDA approved for the following indications:

  • Acute treatment of manic episodes of bipolar disorder
  • Acute treatment of depressive episodes of bipolar disorder
  • Maintenance (long-term) treatment of bipolar disorder (when used alone or with lithium or valproate)
  • Adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder. This means quetiapine is used in addition to an antidepressant to help treat depression.

This medication sheet will focus primarily on schizophrenia. You can find more information about bipolar disorder and depression here.

Quetiapine may also be helpful when prescribed "off-label" for delusional parasitosis, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder, delirium in the intensive care unit, and obsessive compulsive disorder. "Off-label" means that it has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for this condition. Your mental health provider should justify his or her thinking in recommending an "off-label" treatment. They should be clear about the limits of the research around that medication and if there are any other options.

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Quetiapine?

Schizophrenia requires long-term treatment. Do not stop taking quetiapine, even when you feel better.

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With input from you, your health care provider will assess how long you will need to take the medicine.

Missing doses of quetiapine may increase your risk for a relapse in your symptoms.

Do not stop taking quetiapine or change your dose without talking with your healthcare provider first.

For quetiapine to work properly, it should be taken every day as ordered by your healthcare provider.

Are There Specific Concerns About Quetiapine And Pregnancy?

If you are planning on becoming pregnant, notify your healthcare provider to best manage your medications. People living with schizophrenia who wish to become pregnant face important decisions. This is a complex decision since untreated schizophrenia has risks to the fetus, as well as the mother. It is important to discuss the risks and benefits of treatment with your doctor and caregivers.

Antipsychotic use during the third trimester of pregnancy has a risk for abnormal muscle movements (extrapyramidal symptoms [EPS]) and/or withdrawal symptoms in newborns following delivery. Symptoms in the newborn may include agitation, feeding disorder, hypertonia, hypotonia, respiratory distress, somnolence, and tremor; these may be self-limiting or require hospitalization.

Caution is advised with breastfeeding since quetiapine does pass into breast milk.

What Should I Discuss With My Healthcare Provider Before Taking Quetiapine?

  • Symptoms of your condition that bother you the most
  • If you have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • Medications you have taken in the past for your condition, whether they were effective or caused any adverse effects
  • If you ever had muscle stiffness, shaking, tardive dyskinesia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or weight gain caused by a medication
  • If you experience side effects from your medications, discuss them with your provider. Some side effects may pass with time, but others may require changes in the medication.
  • Any psychiatric or medical problems you have, such as heart rhythm problems, long QT syndrome, heart attacks, diabetes, high cholesterol, or seizures
  • If you have a family history of diabetes or heart disease
  • All other medications you are currently taking (including over the counter products, herbal and nutritional supplements) and any medication allergies you have
  • Other non-medication treatment you are receiving, such as talk therapy or substance abuse treatment. Your provider can explain how these different treatments work with the medication.
  • If you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding
  • If you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs

How Should I Take Quetiapine?

Quetiapine is usually taken 1, 2, or 3 times per day with or without food. The extended release should be taken without food or with a light meal (≤300 calories).

Typically patients begin at a low dose of medicine and the dose is increased slowly over several weeks.

The dose usually ranges from 100 mg to 800 mg. Only your healthcare provider can determine the correct dose for you.

The extended release tablets should be swallowed whole. They should not be chewed, crushed, or broken.

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Use a calendar, pillbox, alarm clock, or cell phone alert to help you remember to take your medication. You may also ask a family member or a friend to remind you or check in with you to be sure you are taking your medication.

What Happens If I Miss A Dose Of Quetiapine?

If you miss a dose of quetiapine, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.

What Should I Avoid While Taking Quetiapine?

Avoid drinking alcohol or using illegal drugs while you are taking quetiapine. They may decrease the benefits (e.g. worsen your confusion) and increase adverse effects (e.g. sedation) of the medication.

What Happens If I Overdose With Quetiapine?

If an overdose occurs call your doctor or 911. You may need urgent medical care. You may also contact the poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

A specific treatment to reverse the effects of quetiapine does not exist.

What Are Possible Side Effects Of Quetiapine?

Common side effects

Increased blood pressure, increased heart rate, drowsiness, headache, agitation, dizziness, fatigue, extrapyramidal symptoms, weight gain, cholesterol abnormalities, increased glucose, dry mouth, increased appetite, constipation

Rare/serious side effects

Quetiapine may increase the blood levels of a hormone called prolactin. Side effects of increased prolactin levels include females losing their period, production of breast milk and males losing their sex drive or possibly experiencing erectile problems. Long term (months or years) of elevated prolactin can lead to osteoporosis, or increased risk of bone fractures.

Some people may develop muscle related side effects while taking quetiapine. The technical terms for these are “extrapyramidal symptoms” (EPS) and “tardive dyskinesia” (TD). Symptoms of EPS include restlessness, tremor, and stiffness. TD symptoms include slow or jerky movements that one cannot control, often starting in the mouth with tongue rolling or chewing movements.

Temperature regulation: Impaired core body temperature regulation may occur; caution with strenuous exercise, heat exposure, and dehydration.

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Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) increase the risk of weight gain, high blood sugar, and high cholesterol. This is also known as metabolic syndrome. Your healthcare provider may ask you for a blood sample to check your cholesterol, blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c (a measure of blood sugar over time) while you take this medication.

Information on healthy eating and adding exercise to decrease your chances of developing metabolic syndrome may be found at the following sites:

SGAs have been linked with higher risk of death, strokes, and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in elderly people with behavior problems due to dementia.

All antipsychotics have been associated with the risk of sudden cardiac death due to an arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat). To minimize this risk, antipsychotic medications should be used in the smallest effective dose when the benefits outweigh the risks. Your doctor may order an EKG to monitor for irregular heartbeat.

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a rare, life threatening adverse effect of antipsychotics which occurs in <1% of patients. Symptoms include confusion, fever, extreme muscle stiffness, and sweating. If any of these symptoms occur, contact your healthcare provider immediately.

All antipsychotics can cause sedation, dizziness, or orthostatic hypotension (a drop in blood pressure when standing up from sitting or lying down). These side effects may lead to falls which could cause bone fractures or other injuries. This risk is higher for people with conditions or other medications that could worsen these effects. If falls or any of these symptoms occur, contact your healthcare provider.

Are There Any Risks For Taking Quetiapine For Long Periods Of Time?

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a side effect that develops with prolonged use of antipsychotics. Medications such as quetiapine have been shown to have a lower risk of TD compared to older antipsychotics, such as Haldol® (haloperidol). If you develop symptoms of TD, such as grimacing, sucking, and smacking of lips, or other movements that you cannot control, contact your healthcare provider immediately. All patients taking either first or second generation antipsychotics should have an Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) completed regularly by their healthcare provider to monitor for TD.

Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) increase the risk of diabetes, weight gain, high cholesterol, and high triglycerides. (See “Serious Side Effects” section for monitoring recommendations).

What Other Medications May Interact With Quetiapine?

Quetiapine may block the effects of agents used to treat Parkinson’s disease such as levodopa/carbidopa (Sinemet®), bromocriptine, pramipexole (Mirapex®), ropinirole (Requip®), and others.

The following medications may increase the risk of heart problems when used with quetiapine:

  • Antipsychotics, including chlorpromazine (Thorazine®), thioridizine (Mellaril®), iloperidone (Fanapt®), asenapine (Saphris®), paliperidone (Invega®), ziprasidone (Geodon®)
  • Antiarrhythmics (heart rhythm medications), including procainamide, quinidine, amiodarone (Cordarone®), dronedarone (Multaq®), sotalol (Betapace®)

The following medications may increase the levels and effects of quetiapine:

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  • Erythromycin (Ery-Tab®), fluconazole (Diflucan®), fluvoxamine (Luvox®), and nefazodone.

The following medications may decrease the levels and effects of quetiapine:

  • Carbamazepine (Tegretol®), phenytoin (Dilantin®), phenobarbital, and rifampin (Rifadin®).

How Long Does It Take For Quetiapine To Work?

It is very important to tell your doctor how you feel things are going during the first few weeks after you start taking quetiapine. It will probably take several weeks to see big enough changes in your symptoms to decide if quetiapine is the right medication for you.

Antipsychotic treatment is generally needed lifelong for persons with schizophrenia. Your doctor can best discuss the duration of treatment you need based on your symptoms and illness.

  • Hallucinations, disorganized thinking, and delusions may improve in the first 1-2 weeks
  • Sometimes these symptoms do not completely go away
  • Motivation and desire to be around other people can take at least 1-2 weeks to improve
  • Symptoms continue to get better the longer you take quetiapine
  • It may take 2-3 months before you get the full benefit of quetiapine

Summary of FDA Black Box Warnings

Increased mortality in elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis

  • Both first generation (typical) and second generation (atypical) antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of mortality in elderly patients when used for dementia related psychosis.
  • Although there were multiple causes of death in studies, most deaths appeared to be due to cardiovascular causes (e.g. sudden cardiac death) or infection (e.g. pneumonia).
  • Antipsychotics are not indicated for the treatment of dementia-related psychosis.

Suicidal thoughts or actions in children and adults

  • Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in the risk of suicide.
  • Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), both adult and pediatric, may experience worsening of their depression and/or the emergence of suicidal ideation and behavior (suicidality) or unusual changes in behavior, whether or not they are taking medications. This risk may persist until significant remission occurs.
  • Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional.
  • All patients being treated with this medication for depression should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.

Provided by

Quetiapine (Seroquel) | NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness (1)

(February 2020)

©2019 The College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). CPNP and NAMI make this document available under the Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivatives 4.0 International License. Last Updated: January 2016.

This information is being provided as a community outreach effort of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists. This information is for educational and informational purposes only and is not medical advice. This information contains a summary of important points and is not an exhaustive review of information about the medication. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified medical professional with any questions you may have regarding medications or medical conditions. Never delay seeking professional medical advice or disregard medical professional advice as a result of any information provided herein. The College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists disclaims any and all liability alleged as a result of the information provided herein.

FAQs

What mental illness does Seroquel treat? ›

Quetiapine is a medication that works in the brain to treat schizophrenia. It is also known as a second generation antipsychotic (SGA) or atypical antipsychotic. Quetiapine rebalances dopamine and serotonin to improve thinking, mood, and behavior.

Is quetiapine FDA approved for depression? ›

AstraZeneca today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved once-daily SEROQUEL XR (quetiapine fumarate) Extended Release Tablets as adjunctive (add-on) treatment to antidepressants in adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD).

Is quetiapine FDA approved for bipolar disorder? ›

Flavio Guzman, M.D. Quetiapine is a second-generation antipsychotic approved for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and as adjunct treatment of major depressive disorder.

What does Seroquel do to a normal person? ›

It helps you to think more clearly and positively about yourself, feel less nervous, and take a more active part in everyday life. It may also improve your mood, sleep, appetite, and energy level. Quetiapine can help prevent severe mood swings or decrease how often mood swings occur.

Who should not take Seroquel? ›

You should not use quetiapine if you are allergic to it. Quetiapine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related psychosis and is not approved for this use. Quetiapine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 10 years old.

Does Seroquel have long term effects? ›

The biggest disadvantages of Seroquel are the potential long-term side effects, which can include tardive dyskinesia, increased blood sugar, cataracts, and weight gain. For teens and young adults, the medication may also cause an increase in suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

Is quetiapine a serious drug? ›

Warnings: There may be a slightly increased risk of serious, possibly fatal side effects (such as stroke, heart failure, fast/irregular heartbeat, pneumonia) when this medication is used by older adults with dementia. This medication is not approved for the treatment of dementia-related behavior problems.

Is Seroquel good for anxiety? ›

Research shows that Seroquel can be particularly effective in treating generalized anxiety disorder. In a large 2016 study, researchers studied the effectiveness of quetiapine as a treatment for generalized anxiety disorder.

What is the black box warning on Seroquel? ›

SEROQUEL XR (quetiapine fumarate) is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis (see Boxed Warning).

Can Seroquel cause memory loss? ›

From a 29-year-old woman, after taking Seroquel for one year for anxiety: “Memory loss, shortness of breath, unbeatable fatigue, twitches.”

Is quetiapine a mood stabilizer? ›

the antipsychotic drugs haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone may be offered as mood stabilisers, as part of the treatment of bipolar disorder. The antipsychotic asenapine is also offered as a mood stabiliser, to treat mania.

Can Seroquel treat major depressive disorder? ›

Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate) is an anti-psychotic drug indicated as a treatment for patients with major depressive disorder. In December 2009, AstraZeneca received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration for Seroquel to treat major depressive episodes in patients suffering from MDD.

Can you stay on quetiapine long term? ›

Abstract. Quetiapine is a novel, atypical antipsychotic agent that has been shown to provide long-term efficacy without serious adverse effects in adults.

Can u get addicted to Seroquel? ›

Quetiapine is an atypical or second-generation antipsychotic agent and has been a subject of a series of case report and suggested to have the potential for misuse or abuse. However, it is not a controlled substance and is not generally considered addictive.

Can Seroquel cause anger? ›

Medications like Seroquel can increase risk of suicide and suicidal thoughts, especially at the start of treatment. Report any sudden changes in mood to your healthcare provider, including depression, anxiety, restlessness, panic, irritability, impulsivity, or aggression.

What are the most common side effects of quetiapine? ›

Common side effects may include:
  • speech problems;
  • dizziness, drowsiness, tiredness;
  • lack of energy;
  • fast heartbeats;
  • stuffy nose;
  • increased appetite, weight gain;
  • upset stomach, vomiting, constipation;
  • dry mouth; or.

Does quetiapine calm you down? ›

Quetiapine is an antipsychotic that calms and sedates, helping to relieve psychotic thoughts and manic and depressive behavior. Sedation, low blood pressure, and weight gain are common side effects.

How long do you have to take Seroquel? ›

Many people say that it takes four to six weeks for quetiapine to show its full effect. However, some people experience benefits sooner than this. You should stay in touch with your doctor to see how it goes over the first few weeks. They might do some tests to check your symptoms.

Is it OK to take quetiapine every day? ›

Quetiapine comes as a tablet and as an extended-release tablet to take by mouth. The tablets are usually taken one to three times a day with or without food. The extended-release tablets are usually taken once a day in the evening without food or with a light meal. Take quetiapine at around the same time(s) every day.

Can Seroquel cause psychosis? ›

Serious Side Effects

Some of these include: Increased risk of death due to dementia-related psychosis.

What happens when you stop taking Seroquel? ›

If you stop taking SEROQUEL abruptly you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as insomnia (not being able to sleep), nausea, and vomiting. Keep your doctor well informed of how you are feeling, both good and bad.

What does Seroquel feel like? ›

How does it work? Quetiapine works by attaching to the brain's dopamine receptors and altering serotonin levels. Short-term effects include feeling sleepy, a dry mouth, dizziness and low blood pressure when you stand up. These effects lasts about six hours.

Does quetiapine affect your heart? ›

Quetiapine may cause a condition that affects the heart rhythm (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can infrequently result in serious (rarely fatal) fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms (such as severe dizziness, fainting) that need medical attention right away.

Is 25mg of quetiapine a lot? ›

However, the dose is usually not more than 750 mg per day. Children 13 to 17 years of age—At first, 25 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 800 mg per day.

Can Seroquel make depression worse? ›

Quetiapine (Seroquel) can cause worsening of depression and can lead to suicidal thoughts and behaviors, especially in people age 24 or younger. It's important to look out for changes in mood or behaviors while taking quetiapine (Seroquel).

Does Seroquel stop panic? ›

In this case report, low-dose quetiapine (Seroquel®) effectively treated panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in a patient with bipolar depression.

How long does it take for Seroquel to work for depression? ›

Importantly, patients on Seroquel experienced a significant improvement in depressive symptoms as early as the fourth day of treatment, Weisler says. "Typically, patients don't respond until they have had at least two weeks of antidepressant therapy. And often it can take up to a month," he says.

Can Seroquel treat dementia? ›

Quetiapine is frequently used to treat psychosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. These patients commonly have sleep disturbances that include nighttime awakenings with confused, agitated behaviors.

What drugs interact with Seroquel? ›

Drugs you should not use with quetiapine
  • Anti-arrhythmic drugs such as quinidine, procainamide, amiodarone or sotalol.
  • Antipsychotic drugs such as ziprasidone, chlorpromazine, or thioridazine.
  • Antibiotics such as gatifloxacin or moxifloxacin.
  • Pentamidine.
  • Methadone.

Can Seroquel cause anxiety? ›

May increase the risk of bleeding, especially if used with other drugs that also increase bleeding risk. May also cause anxiety, nervousness, or insomnia.

Is there a lawsuit against Seroquel? ›

The federal lawsuit alleged that AstraZeneca aggressively marketed Seroquel for uses not approved by the FDA, including treating: people with anger management issues. post-traumatic stress disorder.

Does Seroquel damage your liver? ›

Risperidone (Risperdal) and quetiapine (Seroquel) are both used as antipsychotics and antidepressants, and have the potential to cause liver damage.

Does your brain go back to normal after antipsychotics? ›

For neurological, neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and metabolic abnormalities of cerebral function, in fact, there is evidence suggesting that antipsychotic medications decrease the abnormalities and return the brain to more normal function.

Does quetiapine lift your mood? ›

These cases indicate that a side-effect of quetiapine may be mood elevation. An ability to elevate mood while controlling psychoses would be helpful in the treatment of post-psychotic and bipolar depression.

How long does Seroquel take to stabilize mood? ›

Some improvements may be seen within 1 to 2 weeks. It can take up to 6 weeks to see the full benefits of the medication. You (or your family members) may notice clearer thoughts, less moodiness, anger, irritability, or explosive behaviour.

What is the newest drug for bipolar disorder? ›

Caplyta Now Approved for Bipolar Depression in Adults
  • In December 2021, the FDA approved Caplyta (lumateperone) to treat depressive episodes in bipolar 1 or 2 disorder in adults. ...
  • Caplyta is an oral capsule that you take once a day with or without food. ...
  • There are many ways to save on Caplyta.
24 Jan 2022

What antidepressant works well with Seroquel? ›

SEROQUEL XR may help improve your unresolved symptoms of depression when added to an antidepressant
  • Cymbalta® (duloxetine)
  • Effexor® (venlafaxine)
  • Paxil® (paroxetine)
  • Prozac® (fluoxetine)
  • Zoloft® (sertraline)
  • Lexapro® (escitalopram)
  • Celexa® (citalopram)
  • Wellbutrin® (bupropion)

Is Seroquel for manic depression? ›

SEROQUEL XR is a clinically proven treatment option for bipolar disorder. If you are struggling with the manic highs and depressive lows of bipolar disorder, SEROQUEL XR may help. SEROQUEL XR showed positive effects as early as the first week in a clinical trial.

How much QUEtiapine should I take for anxiety? ›

Based on the results obtained in this meta-analysis, it can be concluded that the findings suggest that 50 and 150 mg/day of quetiapine-XR is effective in the treatment of adult GAD.

How fast do you gain weight on Seroquel? ›

Conclusions: Long-term treatment with quetiapine monotherapy is associated with moderate weight gain. Most weight gain occurs within the first 12 weeks of treatment and has no clear dose relationship.

How long before bed should I take quetiapine? ›

Because it is an extended-release medicine, the dose should be taken once a day, 3-4 hours before bedtime. It is very important to follow your health care professional's directions when you take SEROQUEL XR.

Does Seroquel change brain chemistry? ›

A: Seroquel (quetiapine) is an atypical antipsychotic. It works in the brain to change the activity of neurotransmitters. The main ones it affects are serotonin and dopamine.

Is quetiapine similar to Xanax? ›

Are Seroquel and Xanax the Same Thing? Seroquel (quetiapine) and Xanax (alprazolam) are used to treat psychiatric disorders. Seroquel is used to treat schizophrenia, major depression, and bipolar disorder. Xanax is prescribed to treat panic attacks and anxiety disorders.

How much does Seroquel go for on the street? ›

Quetiapine tablets have a street value of $3 to $8 for doses ranging from 25 mg to 100 mg. Although outpatient misuse of quetiapine is common, abuse in correctional settings also is becoming more frequent.

Who should not take Seroquel? ›

You should not use quetiapine if you are allergic to it. Quetiapine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related psychosis and is not approved for this use. Quetiapine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 10 years old.

Why do people get prescribed Seroquel? ›

This medication is used to treat certain mental/mood conditions (such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, sudden episodes of mania or depression associated with bipolar disorder).

What does Seroquel do to a normal person? ›

Quetiapine can cause significant weight gain, even when used in small to moderate doses for sleep. It has also been associated with increased blood glucose (sugar) and dyslipidaemia (an imbalance of fats circulating in the blood). These increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Does Seroquel help with anxiety and depression? ›

May 6, 2008 (Washington) -- The antipsychotic drug Seroquel may help battle major depression and generalized anxiety disorder, two new studies suggest. Seroquel is already approved to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (formerly called manic-depressive illness).

Is Seroquel used to treat anxiety? ›

Anxiety Treatment

Neither the immediate release nor extended-release versions of Seroquel are approved by the FDA for treating anxiety disorders. However, the drug is often used off-label for the treatment of this condition. In fact, the most common off-label use of Seroquel is for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

Does Seroquel help with bipolar depression? ›

SEROQUEL XR is a clinically proven treatment option for bipolar disorder. If you are struggling with the manic highs and depressive lows of bipolar disorder, SEROQUEL XR may help. SEROQUEL XR showed positive effects as early as the first week in a clinical trial.

Is quetiapine used for borderline personality disorder? ›

Conclusion: Initial data suggest that quetiapine is efficacious and well tolerated in treating patients who have borderline personality disorder, particularly when impulsiveness/aggressiveness-related symptoms are prominent.

Can u get addicted to Seroquel? ›

Quetiapine is an atypical or second-generation antipsychotic agent and has been a subject of a series of case report and suggested to have the potential for misuse or abuse. However, it is not a controlled substance and is not generally considered addictive.

Does quetiapine stabilize mood? ›

Using a liberal definition, the evidence for quetiapine qualifies it as a bimodal mood stabilizer based on its demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of bipolar mania and depression.

Does quetiapine calm you down? ›

Quetiapine is an antipsychotic that calms and sedates, helping to relieve psychotic thoughts and manic and depressive behavior. Sedation, low blood pressure, and weight gain are common side effects.

Can Seroquel make depression worse? ›

Quetiapine (Seroquel) can cause worsening of depression and can lead to suicidal thoughts and behaviors, especially in people age 24 or younger. It's important to look out for changes in mood or behaviors while taking quetiapine (Seroquel).

How will quetiapine make me feel? ›

Taking quetiapine may make you feel tired or dizzy, and may affect your eyesight when you start taking it. This could affect you if you drive a car, ride a bike, or do anything else that needs a lot of focus. It might be best to stop doing these things for the first few days, until you know how it affects you.

Can Seroquel cause memory loss? ›

From a 29-year-old woman, after taking Seroquel for one year for anxiety: “Memory loss, shortness of breath, unbeatable fatigue, twitches.”

What is the newest medication for bipolar? ›

Caplyta Now Approved for Bipolar Depression in Adults
  • In December 2021, the FDA approved Caplyta (lumateperone) to treat depressive episodes in bipolar 1 or 2 disorder in adults. ...
  • Caplyta is an oral capsule that you take once a day with or without food. ...
  • There are many ways to save on Caplyta.
24 Jan 2022

Does quetiapine help with anger? ›

Quetiapine has demonstrated efficacy in aggression, impulsivity, and irritability and has proved to be an effective medication in these patients with APD. In addition, its favorable adverse-event profile makes patients willing to comply.

What is the best mood stabilizer? ›

Lithium and quetiapine top the lists for all three phases of the illness: mania, depression, and the maintenance phase. Lurasidone and lamotrigine are either untested (lurasidone) or ineffective (lamotrigine) in mania, but they are essential tools for bipolar depression.

Can quetiapine change your personality? ›

Taking quetiapine will not change your personality and it is not addictive.

What is the best mood stabilizer for borderline personality disorder? ›

Common anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers for BPD include:
  • Depakote (valproate)
  • Lamictal (lamotrigine)
  • Lithobid (lithium)
  • Tegretol or Carbatrol (carbamazepine)
4 days ago

Does Seroquel cause personality changes? ›

Medications like Seroquel can increase risk of suicide and suicidal thoughts, especially at the start of treatment. Report any sudden changes in mood to your healthcare provider, including depression, anxiety, restlessness, panic, irritability, impulsivity, or aggression.

Videos

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